Children's Librarian, librarian, library, Tween Services, Tween Tasters

Tween Tasters: Rainbow Rice Krispy Treats

Hi everyone!

Here’s the latest iteration of my Tween Tasters program during COVID-19! A layered rice krispy snack, made with marshmallow peeps and including a rainbow. The tweens are sure to love it.

 

Rainbow Rice Krispy Treats

Ingredients
(4) 3 ounce packages of different colored Peep marshmallows
4 tablespoons of butter
6 cups of Rice Krispy cereal (divided 4 times into 1.5 cups)
Non-stick cooking spray

Directions

  1. Line a loaf pan or casserole dish with aluminum foil.
  2. Microwave 3 oz (one package) of marshmallows with 1 tablespoon of butter in microwave safe bowl (make sure it is big, as the marshmallows will expand with heat).
  3. Mix hot marshmallows and butter with a spatula (spray spatula with non-stick cooking spray first); add 1.5 cups of cereal, stir with spatula.
  4. Press firmly into pan or casserole dish using spatula.
  5. Repeat 3 times with each colored marshmallow peeps.
  6. Allow to cool completely before removing aluminum foil and cutting into pieces. (Place in fridge for 1/2 hour to speed up the cooling down process).
  7. Enjoy!
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Children's Librarian, librarian, library, Public Library Services, Tween Services, Tween Tasters

Tween Tasters Continued

Hey everyone!

Here is the second Tween Tasters program I was able to do this week! It is a one bowl recipe for Chocolate Chip Banana Bread. It was delicious. I have been using my iPhone and a tripod for recording my videos, and editing them with iMovie. It is a super easy and user friendly app for editing movies like this one.

What are you doing to serve your tweens/children during COVID-19?

 

 

Banana Chocolate Chip Bread Recipe

Ingredients

3 ripe bananas

⅓ cup butter, melted

½ cup sugar

1 egg, beaten

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 teaspoon baking soda

salt, to taste

1 ½ cups all-purpose flour

½ cup mini chocolate chips

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350˚F.
  2. In a bowl, add the bananas and mash until smooth.
  3. Add in the melted butter and stir until well combined.
  4. Add the sugar, egg, vanilla, baking soda, salt, and flour, and stir until the batter is smooth.
  5. Add in the chocolate chips and pour the batter into a greased loaf pan.
  6. Top with additional chocolate chips.
  7. Bake for 50 minutes to an hour, or until a toothpick comes out clean.
  8. Cool completely before serving.
  9. Enjoy!
brazenbibliosoph, librarian, library, Public Library Services, Tween Services, Tween Tasters

Tween Programming During COVID-19

Hello everyone!

What an interesting time it is to be a Children’s Librarian. As we continue to work on how to bring virtual programming to our kids who are busy e-learning at home, I have been enjoying doing things I cannot currently do at the library as far as programming. For example, we are not permitted to bake/cook/make food in our library programming, but my Tweens really want to be exploring that avenue! So, I came up with Tween Tasters, a program they can watch from home and learn to bake some tasty treats!

Enjoy this video on how to make a mock version of Cheesecake Factory’s Key Lime Cheesecake!

P.S. It’s delicious! Recipe below.

 

Key Lime Cheesecake Recipe

Ingredients

Crust

1/4 cup of sugar

1/2 cup melted butter

2 cups graham cracker crumbs (approximately 2 sleeves)

Filling

3 (8 oz.) packages of cream cheese (softened to room temperature)

1 cup sugar

1 cup of sour cream

4 eggs

1/4 cup of flour

2 teaspoons vanilla

3/4 cup of key lime juice

Directions 

  1. In 9 or 10 inch springform pan, combine graham cracker crumbs, melted butter, and 1/4 cup sugar
  2. Press evenly over bottom of pan and halfway up sides
  3. Bake at 375 for 7-8 minutes
  4. Cream room temperature cream cheese well, add sugar, and cream until smooth, scraping sides and bottom of bowl frequently to integrate any cream cheese lumps
  5. Cream in sour cream, eggs, flour and vanilla
  6. When smooth once more, stir in lime juice. (Note: 3/4 Cup of Key Lime juice makes a very tart cheesecake. If you prefer a less tart cheesecake, start with 1/3 cup and increase to taste.)
  7. Pour over prepared crust
  8. Return to 375 oven for 15 minutes
  9. Lower temperature to 250 and continue baking 50 minutes for 10 inch pan, 55 minutes for 9 inch pan
  10. Cool on wire rack IN PAN for 20 minutes
  11. Run a butter knife around edge to loosen cheesecake, but do NOT remove from pan
  12. Refrigerate at least 6 hours before serving
  13. Enjoy!
BookReview, brazenbibliosoph, ilovelibraries, librarian, library, Review, School Library Journal

A Dress for the Wicked by Autumn Krause (ARC Review)

A Dress for the Wicked by Autumn Krause

Review published in School Library Journal July, 18, 2019

A Dress for the Wicked

HarperTeen. Aug. 2019. 400p. Tr $17.99. ISBN 9780062857330.
COPY ISBN

Gr 7 Up–Emmy Watkins grew up in the country town of Shy, Avon-upon-Kent, where she and her mother run a pub. Emmy loves the beauty and quietness of her life in Shy, but yearns for more. She’s a fashion designer, and dreams of joining the prestigious Fashion House in the city. Madame Jolène, Europe’s fashion muse, runs the house and designs for the Crown. Every year the Fashion House invites five worthy contestants to participate in an Interview; they live at the Fashion House and participate in three challenges. Whoever wins may be invited to work at the Fashion House. Emmy never would have been chosen, but the Reformists Party is pressuring Madame Jolène to have a participant from the country, in order to push their agenda. Emmy faces adversity from her arrival—she does not receive the welcome letter her roommate Sophie got, and Tilda, the maid assigned to Emmy, does not wake her up for her first day. Emmy will not give up—she loves to design, it is where she feels most like herself, her sketches spring from her heart. Readers will root for Emmy to overcome the difficulties put in her way, and help move Avon-upon-Kent to a more inclusive place for blooming fashion designers.

 

VERDICT A beautiful debut, recommended for school and library collections where Kiera Cass’s Selection series is well liked.

 

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~*All the Love of Books From Me to You <3*~

Gretchen

BookReview, brazenbibliosoph, librarian, library, Review

Dirty Secret: A Daughter Comes Clean About Her Mother’s Compulsive Hoarding (Review!) by Jessie Sholl

Dirty Secret by Jessie Sholl

5 out of 5 Stars

My Review:

Wow, I really could not put this book down. Jessie’s writing is fantastic; I could feel her pain, I could feel her compulsion to help her mom, I could feel her depression, and I even could sometimes feel her scabies (it was not pleasant). Sholl tells the story of her mother’s compulsive hoarding, starting in present day, and incorporating flashbacks as necessary. Present day Jessie arrives in Minneapolis determined to help her mom by cleaning her house. But, when she arrives, it is way too much for one person, and it does not help that her mother is less than enthusiastic about cleaning. The flashbacks include Jessie’s memories of her childhood, and Jessie’s stories of her mother’s childhood. Both can be very sad, but help the reader to understand how the disease of compulsive hoarding works in this family system. Sholl is a writing teacher, and it shows. Her sentences, chapters, and the book overall were enticing all the way through. Putting this book down a big fan of Jessie Sholl.
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~*All the Love of Books From Me to You <3*~

Gretchen

 

BookReview, brazenbibliosoph, librarian, Netgalley, Review, Tween Services

Cretaceous by Tadd Galusha (Review!)

40538822

Pub Date: March 26, 2019

4 out of 5 Stars

My Review:

A graphic novel filled with beautiful illustrations of both land and sea dinosaurs of the cretaceous period. T-Rex, per usual, takes on the role of main character as he tried to reunite with remaining members of his family after tragedy strikes. Filled with death, birth, gore, and blood, this is not for the faint of heart. Recommended for tweens aged 9-14 who appreciate death scenes and are not disturbed by them.

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~*All the Love of Books From Me to You <3*~

Gretchen

 

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BookReview, brazenbibliosoph, Children's Librarian, librarian, library, Netgalley, Review

House Without Walls (ARC Review!) by Ching Yeung Russell

House Without Walls

Pub Date: June 18, 2019

5 out of 5 Stars

My Review:

A novel for youth written in verse; Russell tells the story of Southern Vietnamese “boat people”, beginning in May of 1979. This group were targeted by the Vietcong Communist party when they took over Saigon in 1975. By 1978, the government was shutting down their businesses, taking away their homes, and sending men to reeducation camps or forcing them to fight against China at the border. Both deadly missions.

In order to escape communist rule, 1 million Vietnamese and Chinese fled and traveled by boat. Most did not survive. They sought refuge in countries along the Malaysian coastline, and other Southeast Asians countries. The boat trip was brutal, inhumane, unsanitary, and abysmal.

Our main character’s name is Lam, and her brothers are Daigo and Dee Dee. The story opens with the three siblings saying goodbye to their Ah Mah (grandma) and ma (mother), nervous about leaving their home and family. Their Baba (father) escaped two years ago after his shop was shut down, and now lives in San Francisco. The goal is to get to America to live with him.

Lam and Dee Dee endure a 13 month journey from Vietnam to San Francisco, and during each part, emotions run high. On the open sea there is a fear of pirates, fear of running out of drinkable water and food, fear of the boat dying, and fear of each other dying. On land in refugee camps, hope is brought by the Red Cross. But, then disease spreads, deadly snakes bite, and depression sets in. They endured a treacherous trek, and Russell does an amazing job of relaying the truth of what happened during this forgotten time in our world’s history. It was a pleasure and an honor to learn about Lam’s story from Russell’s perspective.

 

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~*All the Love of Books From Me to You <3*~

Gretchen

AbovetheTreeline, BookReview, brazenbibliosoph, Edelweiss+, librarian, library, Review

Other Words For Home (ARC Review!) by Jasmine Warga

Other Words for Home

 

5 out of 5 Stars

My Review:

Jasmine Warga has written a beautiful and timely novel in verse about a Syrian Muslim tween and her mother leaving their home behind for the United States. Jude comes to the US as a refugee, escaping the war torn Syria. Jude knows very little English, and misses her older brother and father terribly. This new land is confusing, and the story progresses as Jude navigates her way through seeking home and friendships in America, while never losing her love of home. She finds comfort, friendship, laughter and camaraderie in her ESL class, where she and her classmates learn English slang words like “bougie.” At times laugh out loud funny, at times heart-wrenchingly unfair, Warga is writing in Own Voice and the novel succeeds splendidly.  Recommended for tweens aged 9-12.

 

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~*All the Love of Books From Me to You <3*~

Gretchen

BookReview, brazenbibliosoph, librarian, library, Netgalley, Review

The Lovely and the Lost (ARC Review!) by Jennifer Lynn Barnes

The Lovely and the Lost

5 out of 5 Stars

My Review:

Kira was saved by Cady when she was a little girl surviving in the wilderness. Kira does not remember much from life before Cady and Jude, just the survival instincts she needed to stay alive. Eleven years later, Kira still only calls Cady by her first name, but she is her mom, and Jude is her foster brother.

Cady is in the search and rescue business, a family affair. Kira, Jude, Cady, and Free train search and rescue dogs (find, play, find, play). It is perfect for Kira because she can understand animal instincts more than she can understand human emotions.

Cady is estranged from her father, and left her childhood in the Sierra Glades National Park behind when she got pregnant with Jude. When he shows up one day, he asks for Cady’s help to come home and help search for a missing little girl.

Resistant at first due to underlying issues from her past, eventually Cady packs up her teenagers and their dogs and returns home to start the search.

A survivalist novel at the core, Barnes has the perfect ingredients for an awesome YA novel. I could not put this down, and promise you will not be able to either.

 

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~*All the Love of Books From Me to You <3*~

Gretchen

 

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BookReview, brazenbibliosoph, librarian, Netgalley, Review

The Bride Test: The Kiss Quotient #2 (ARC Review!) by Helen Hoang

The Bride Test (The Kiss Quotient, #2)

5 out of 5 Stars

My Review:

Khai is handsome, sexy, and a genius. The owner of a hugely successful business, he has more money than he could possibly know what to do with. (And he most definitely will not be landscaping his yard, especially after his annoying neighbor has complained about it multiple times.) But Khai has a secret, and it has to do with his cousin, his best friend who died when they were teenagers. His secret keeps him from getting close to people, but his mom thinks it’s because he’s autistic. She wants Khai to have a date to all their family weddings this summer, so she flies to the motherland, Vietnam, to bring him home a wife.

Esme lives with her daughter, mother, and grandmother in poverty in Vietnam. She learned from a young age to be scrappy, hard working, and to care for her family with lots of love. When Khai’s mom sees her in the hotel’s bathroom cleaning toilets, she sees Esme’s beauty and chooses her as the bride-to-be. Esme is not so sure about marriage, but she and her family decide it is best for her to go to the United States. Think of the opportunities, they tell her. She secretly also wants to find her father, who went to Berkley, but who she has never met.

What happens next is funny, sexy, romantic and enthralling. Hoang has written a hilarious romance novel with deep substance and successfully creates a connection between the reader and the characters that I will remember long after the book has shut. I hope there will be a third book in her Kiss Quotient series, because I cannot wait to see what happens next! The Bride Test is a great summer read!

 

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~*All the Love of Books From Me to You <3*~

Gretchen

 

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BookReview, Graphic Novel, librarian, Netgalley, Review

Teen Titans: Raven (ARC Review!) by Kami Garcia

5 out of 5 Stars

My Review:

Raven, born Rachel Roth, has superpowers she was unaware of. Her foster mom, Viv, has just died in a fatal car crash and Raven is sent to live with her Aunt Natalia and cousin. After the accident, at first Raven’s powers display themselves at school where she realized she can read people’s minds. Then, she starts to have disturbing nightmares. She’s new to the school in New Orleans, but things start to look up when cutie Tommy Torres shows an interest in Raven and asks her to the prom. But things are never what they seem in superhero’s stories are they? Who has ulterior motives, and why can she make bad things happen to people through her thoughts?

A quick, enjoyable comic book with captivating and illustrations that pop off the page by Gabriel Picolo.

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~*All the Love of Books From Me to You <3*~

Gretchen

BookReview, brazenbibliosoph, librarian, Review

The Last Woman in the Forest (Review!) by Diane Les Becquets

Nikki – Last Woman mockup-SLANTED.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 out of 5 Stars

My Review:

A well-researched psychological thriller about a psychopath named Tate and his latest victim, Marian. Both have a love for the wilderness and meet on an assignment to help save wildlife. Marian is quiet, introverted, kind, and ultimately easily manipulated. Tate sometimes has a blank look in his stare, and sometimes his anger scares Marian, but his love for her is deep, and their love is passionate, so she trusts him. When Tate is involved in a bear attack, everything changes.

At times engaging and worth the read, at other times a little boring. My favorite character ended up being the Psychological Profiler, Nick, with whom Marian forms a daughter to father relationship with. Nick is an expert, and his side story of being diagnosed with cancer while still helping Marian in her trauma, is very endearing. I struggled with Les Becquets’ writing when she was writing from the perspective of Nick. It was at times obvious that a woman was writing a man’s voice.

Overall, I am impressed with the research Les Becquets did while writing this book, and respect her as an author.

 

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~*All the Love of Books From Me to You <3*~

Gretchen

BookReview, Children's Librarian, librarian, library, Review

Wild Robots (Review!) by Peter Brown

The Wild Robot

5 out of 5 Stars

My Review:

A very cute story about a robot named Roz, who was on a ship full of other robots when a hurricane swirled and she was washed up on the shore of a remote island. Roz’s head was discovered by a group of otters who accidentally turn her on. Roz’s computer awakens, and suddenly there is a robot living amongst the wild animals of the island. A story of love, friendship, and technology. I enjoyed this!

 

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~*All the Love of Books From Me to You <3*~

Gretchen

BookReview, brazenbibliosoph, Graphic Novel, librarian, Review

The Life-Changing Manga of Tidying Up: a Magical Story (Review!) by Marie Kondo

71oqutJjZBL

5 out of 5 Stars

My Review:

Six million copies sold later, #1 New York Times Best Selling author of, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, Marie Kondo and manga artist Yuko Uramoto team up to create this graphic novel version of her acclaimed book.

A treat for the eyes, the illustrations are lovely and inspire. I tried to read the book version of this a few times, but this GN did a lot more for me. Being able to see how Kondo recommends folding, sorting, and storing was very helpful.

I thoroughly enjoyed this!

Quotes I loved:

“Storage is not the answer to clutter! You must begin by discarding! Storage! It’s nothing but a cosmetic solution!” ~Konmari

“In addition to material value, our things have three types of value. 1. Functional 2. Informational 3. Emotional. Plus the element of rarity.” ~Konmari

“…you need courage to let go.” ~Konmari

“The true purpose of your home and your things is to bring happiness. So, naturally, the criterion for choosing should be whether keeping something will make you  happy–whether it will bring you joy.” ~Konmari

“Does it spark joy? Remember…joy is the standard for choosing.”

“Nine out of ten items demoted to loungeware ARE NEVER WORN!”

“Don’t dress “just for the time being.” Wear clothes you love!”

“Clothes that have been thrown into a drawer clearly differ from those that have been carefully folded. Clothes that’ve been folded seem brighter and more resilient. Folding our clothes is an expression of love and appreciation. And our clothes will respond. To fold your clothes is to converse with them.”

“Wrinkles are caused by pressure, not the number of folds! If you store them upright, they won’t wrinkle as easily because there’s no weight.”

“Kyun is the sound of joy rising.”

IMG_8437

Photo Credit: Marie Kondo & Yuko Uramoto, 2017, Ten Speed Press

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~*All the Love of Books From Me to You <3*~

Gretchen

BookReview, librarian, library, Netgalley, Review

Park Avenue Summer (ARC Review!) by Renee Rosen

38882569

3.5 out of 5 Stars

My Review:

Helen Gurley Brown is the author of the spirited novel, Sex and the Single Girl, and is the small-but-fierce feminist the big wigs at Hearst decide to hire as Editor-in-Chief when they want to revamp their magazine, Cosmopolitan.

It’s 1965 in New York; doctors are still refusing to prescribe single women the pill for fear of assisting to ‘ruin’ their lives, and it’s this breaking-of-the-1960s-housewife-mold that Alice dives head first into when she takes the job at Cosmo. She has just moved from the Midwest to the Big Apple to live out her dream of being a photographer. In the same spirit as The Devil Wears Prada, Ali has to take a position not as a photog, but as Brown’s assistant–to get her foot in the door of media publishing. While Brown is no Miranda Priestly, she has her own host of issues (crying spells being one of them), and Ali finds herself half the time in shock (tracking down back issues of Playboy is not what a nice girl should be doing) and half the time in awe (taking on a room full of potential marketing investors over lunch, anyone?) of her boss.

Fast-paced, fun, sexy, and passionate, Rosen writes a lively period piece just in time to be your next quick summer beach read. Fans of Lauren Weisberger, Sophie Kinsella, and Maria Semple will enjoy.

Trivia: Helen Gurley Brown really was the author of Sex and the Single Girl, and really was the Editor-in-Chief at Cosmo for 35 years! Renee Rosen was inspired to write a novel based on 1960s New York after binge watching Mad Men, and it turned in to Brown’s story at Cosmo! Read more about that here!

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~*All the Love of Books From Me to You <3*~

Gretchen

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BookReview, brazenbibliosoph, Children's Librarian, Netgalley, Review

The Library of Ever (ARC Review!) by Zeno Alexander

41257867

5 out of 5 Stars

My Review:

Lenora’s parents are traveling when, her nanny takes her to the local library. It is there she gets transported to the Library of Ever, and lands her first job as Fourth Assistant Apprentice Librarian. A job she does not take lightly, and solemnly swears to follow the librarian’s oath for: to work hard, to venture forth bravely and find the answer to any question no matter the challenge; to find a path for those who are lost, and to improvise and think on her feet and rely on her wits and valor; to oppose the enemies of knowledge with all her courage and strength, wherever they might be found.

‘Knowledge is a Light’ are the words above the archway Lenora enters through, and as she goes on one adventure after another answering her patron’s questions, or leading home the lost, she seeks to find the meaning of this phrase. Lenora travels from Wales to Iraq, from Mt. Everest to Mt. Chimborazo, and from the year 1582 to the year 8000.

Alexander has written a charming pro-library tale for bibliophiles of all ages, filled with knowledge, time-travel, robots, talking animals, excitement, and a courageous young girl. I absolutely enjoyed this novel, aimed for 9-12 year olds, and will regularly recommend it to my tween-aged patrons looking for their next great read.

 

 

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~*All the Love of Books From Me to You <3*~

Gretchen

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brazenbibliosoph, librarian, library, Netgalley, Review

One Summer in Paris (ARC Review!) by Sarah Morgan

one

5 out of 5 Stars

My Review:

Grace cannot wait to gift David their 25 year anniversary present: a summer in Paris. He works so hard, and it will be a great opportunity for them to re-group and start planning their future as empty-nesters, with their daughter Sophie also traveling for the summer before starting Stanford in the Fall. Grace has taken care of everything, per usual. Booked the flights, the hotel, and even made sure with David’s boss he could have the time off. She loves him so much, and still cannot believe how lucky she has been to have such a great marriage to such a handsome man for 25 years. Grace is very shocked when, at their anniversary dinner– David admitted to an affair, and asked for a divorce. Then had the nerve to have a heart attack in the restaurant. Bastard.

Audrey is graduating high school after her exams are over, and then is promptly getting the hell away from her mother as quickly as possible. Eighteen years of taking care of her alcoholic mother have been taxing, and she is ready to leave and take care of herself for once. She has been dreaming of the day, and saving every penny she earned on weekends at the hair salon. Stashing the money in her teddy bear, a surefire place to hide money from a drunk. Or so she thought. Until one day Audrey comes home and her mother has decided to clean, starting in Audrey’s room, and cleared out all the childish stuff.

Grace and Audrey do not  know each other, but they both end up in Paris for the summer. Connected by one book shop. Sarah Morgan has written the ultimate cute, hilarious, and assimilated Parisian summer novel. I laughed out loud, felt Grace and Audrey’s pain, and felt at home in the pages of this cozy novel. As a first time reader of Morgan’s, I will definitely be on the lookout for anything from her in the future and will backtrack into her 80+ already published titles.

 

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~*All the Love of Books From Me to You <3*~

Gretchen

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brazenbibliosoph, library, Netgalley, Review

The Book of Dreams (ARC Review!) by Nina George

cover154061-medium

4 out of 5 Stars

My Review:

Originally penned in Nina George’s native German in 2016, it will hit US shelves in English this April.

Sam was born to Henri and Marie-France, war reporters who met among turmoil and sadness, and whom conceived Sam one night in moments of desperation for longing of normalcy and a need to fill a loneliness. Sam is 13, and a synesthete. He has  more sensory receptors than other people, he sees sounds, voices, and music as colors. When he enters a room, he can tell which emotions have been felt in it most frequently.

He is part of the elite high IQ society, Mensa, and his parents are no longer together. That is why he secretly invited his dad to come to his school event that day. Sam could not tell Marie-France he had invited Henri. She is a wounded woman, hell-bent on keeping out of harm’s way after working as a photographer in war zones for years. Sam cannot  bring himself to hurt her. In fact, he wants to protect her from everything and tell her how much he loves her, but does not know how to go about it. He feels like all she sees when she looks at him is the kid who never looks anyone in the eye, reads too much science fiction, and is a permanent reminder of a man she can’t stand.

When Sam witnesses Henri risk his life to save a little girl’s, Maddie, and winds up in a coma, the story becomes one of missed opportunities, and life’s haunting questions. Will Henri and Maddie survive their comas? Will Sam be able to reach them with his gift through their coma hazes? Henri’s ex, Edwina (Eddie), plays a big role here too, as his emergency contact, the doctor’s and Sam are looking to her for decisions to be made. She cannot believe Henri has a son he never told her about, after all their years together. At times unbelievably sad, at times uproariously hopeful, Nina George has penned a great novel full of all the emotions that keep great novels with us years after we put them down.

Quotes I loved:

“…I am here. I breathe, and with each exhalation, I seek to blow my anxiety somewhere far over the horizon, to the ends of the earth…I decide not to be scared and I blow my fear a long, long way away.” ~Eddie

“Don’t think. Follow the image you see inside you and slowly re-create it with your voice. Don’t search for words to capture your pain and your consolation. Seek out a place and sing it.” ~Eddie’s Father

“He’s a precious cargo, the son of the man who was my sun and my moon. Who was with me as I breathes and slept, a fount of desire and tenderness.” ~Eddie

“That’s the magic of literature. We read a story, and something happens. We don’t know what or why, nor which sentence was responsible, but the world has changed and will never be the same again.” ~Eddie

“”That’s how you confront a challenge that seems overwhelming at first. That’s how you manage.” Shrink the world, be precise; pay no heed to the long night before you but only to the next moment. That’s what he told me. “You must follow the path to the very end to get an overview of the whole journey, Edwina.””~Eddie’s Father

“So this is the meaning of life. For the first time I understand men who don’t leave their families, even when they’ve fallen out of love with their wives. It’s because of these little people. These pure little people. Loving them is so simple and incurable.”~Henri

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~*All the Love of Books From Me to You <3*~

Gretchen

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Children's Librarian, librarian, library, Public Library Services, Tween Services

Coding w/HTML

office working app computer

Hi everyone!

Interested in teaching an introduction to coding with HTML to Tweens at your library or in your classroom? I tackled this recently, and wanted to share these documents in the hopes of making this topic more accessible to other librarians and teachers. Have fun and let me know if you have any questions!

Instructional Handout for Tweens

PowerPoint Slides w/Notes

 

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~*All the Love of Books From Me to You <3*~

Gretchen

 

 

brazenbibliosoph, library, Review

One Day In December (Audiobook Review!) by Josie Silver

one day in december

5 out of 5 Stars

My Review:

Laurie and Jack lock eyes one day in December 2008…she is on the bus, and when they see each other, it’s over. She silently begs him to get on the bus, he’s the most gorgeous man she’s ever seen. He seems to understand, but just as quick as it began, the moment is over, and the bus drives on.

Her flatmate and best friend, Sarah, helps her look for ‘bus boy’ at every bar, coffee shop, and street corner for the next year. Laurie was struck dumb when, Sarah brings bus boy home one day, to introduce him to Laurie as her boyfriend. How could this be? Does bus boy recognize her?

The story continues to follow Laurie, Jack, and Sarah as their lives progress throughout their 20s; jobs, marriages, birthdays, New Years resolutions. Are Laurie and Jack meant to be together? Will that one day in December forever represent what could have been? Or what could be?

I listened to the audiobook version of this book, and loved the experience. Eleanor Tomlinson, English actress currently acting in Poldark, and Charlie Anson, English actor, narrate splendidly! Eleanor is the sweetest thing, and it was an absolute joy to listen to Silver’s story come to life through her voice. It felt like I was the invisible third best friend with Laurie and Sarah; I laughed when they laughed, and cried when they cried.

Of last note, the romance in the book is smokin’ hot!

I loved this book.

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~*All the Love of Books From Me to You <3*~

Gretchen